Join Us

We invite interested Hauri males, of whatever spelling, to have a yDNA test and share their results with us. The Hauri yDNA project uses Family Tree DNA, which will do the test, report the results, and notify us (with your permission). Family Tree DNA uses the lab of Dr. Michael Hammer at the University of … Read more

Media Reports

About the Hauri yDNA Project Justin Howery, Are We or Are We Not? (Nov. 17, 2000). Dick Eastman, Howery and Howry Families Linked by DNA Study (Dec. 6, 2000). Margie Wylie, Genealogists Turn to DNA in Tracing Family Trees (Jan. 28, 2001). Megan Smolenyak, What’s Next in the World of DNA Testing? (January-February 2003). Sarah Brown, Family History: Going Way … Read more

Related Families

When surnames were adopted (about 1250-1300 in Switzerland), members of the same paternal line will have have adopted different surnames. So, the Swiss Hauris should be paternally related to dozens of other German and Swiss families with different surnames. DNA test results can reveal these connections. Because genetic testing for genealogy is still in its … Read more

Haplogroup I

Haplogroup I is almost entirely confined to Europe, where it accounts for 20 percent of the population. The mutation that defines it is believed to have occurred 22.2 thousand years ago somewhere in Europe. Semino et al. (2000) believe that Haplogroup I stems from the Gravettian culture, which arrived in Europe from the Middle East about … Read more

Hauri Test Results

All male Hauris and Haurys in Switzerland, France and Germany, and their Howery, Howry and Howrey cousins in America, theoretically should have nearly identical y chromosomes, because they almost certainly belong to the same male line, originating in Beromünster, Switzerland in the early 1300s. There hasn’t been time for many mutations in our y chromosomes. … Read more

Key Concepts

Remembering high school biology, women have two x chromosomes, one inherited from the father and one from the mother. Men have an x chromosome inherited from the mother and a y chromosome inherited from the father. This difference comes about because each sperm contains either an x chromosome or a y chromosome, while each egg … Read more

Hauri DNA Project

All modern humans descend in the male line from a particular man, nicknamed Genetic Adam, who lived in Africa about 142 thousand years ago (~7,100 generations). All living men have inherited his y chromosome (yDNA), along with the mutations that have accumulated in our individual family lines. Unlike autosomal DNA, yDNA does not recombine. It … Read more

Haplogroup J

This haplogroup is found at highest frequencies in Middle Eastern and north African populations, where it probably evolved. This marker has been carried by Middle Eastern traders into Europe, central Asia, India and Pakistan. Brian Sykes used the name Re to represent the founder of Haplogroup J (Saxons, Vikings, and Celts, 2006). Haplogroup J1 This … Read more

Historic DNA

All living men have inherited their y chromosome from Genetic Adam, along with the mutations that have accumulated in their individual family lines. Geneticists can test for these accumulated mutations. By analyzing the mutations present in modern men, geneticists can group them. Individual test results show a man’s haplotype. Men with the same haplotype are likely to belong … Read more

Haplogroups

All modern humans descend in the male line from a particular man, nicknamed “Genetic Adam,” who lived about 60,000 years ago. All living men have inherited his y chromosome (yDNA), along with the mutations that have accumulated in our individual family lines. Geneticists can test for these accumulated mutations. Individual test results show a man’s haplotype. … Read more